Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Candidate Care- Does Anyone Really Care?



Generally speaking, Candidate Care is a pet peeve of mine and I have the utmost respect for anyone who gets it right. It means putting your best presence forward all the time.

Oft times, particularly in the period of high unemployment, forgotten are the lowly candidates-- candidates who may turn into employees, customers, clients and investors.

Simple things can make a difference like returning emails, providing one point of contact, giving someone your undivided attention during an interview and providing them with written information in advance of their interview to let them know what they can expect when they show up.

More? Be on time for your interview, offer coffee, food, free company products and how about a list of the best business books you've read this year.


Best practice? How about implementing a Candidate Care Policy. Here's one I just swiped off the internet:

Candidate Care Policy

Treat candidates with respect
  • Treat candidates as professionals and like customers or investors and ensure they are kept informed through every step of the process
  • Respect the candidate's time and avoid requesting excess information
  • Answer questions quickly and honestly
  • Ask the candidate what their expectations are and get their feedback during the process.
Provide accurate and current information on the job
  • Inform candidates on issues such as work/life balance, job sharing, flexible arrangements and career opportunities
  • Only post jobs that are realistically available to outside candidates
  • Remove job ads that have been filled as soon as possible.
Provide information on the selection process
  • Notify candidates promptly when their initial application is received, accepted or rejected
  • Tell candidates about the entire hiring process, including minimum,maximum time frames, who they will meet and the finalist selection criteria
  • Give honest feedback and be positive and constructive.
The interview process
  • Ensure best practice interview techniques are adopted and candidates experience a fair and legal interview
  • Limit the number of interviews
  • Respect the candidate's current employment by organising interview times and locations that are convenient for them
  • Make the interview a conversation between equals and not adversarial
  • Where possible give candidates the chance to speak to current employees. This will help to reassure candidates that the role is being realistically represented.
The offer process
  • Make a fair offer within the candidate's expectations
  • Give the candidate information that will aid their evaluation of the job such as bonus potential, job security, and career development
  • Don't place pressure on the candidate to make a decision straight away and reassure them that whatever the decision, it is the right one for them
  • Give the candidate the option to gracefully back out of a job during the first three months.
Keep in regular contact
  • For those people who are still looking for work, phone or email candidates regularly to let them know that we are still looking for opportunities for them even if there is no news
  • Keep notes on the database about each candidate’s current status and keep track of who you have and have not contacted to avoid duplication of effort
  • Email registered candidates to obtain an update on their status, and to ascertain if they are still looking for a position. People appreciate the follow up.
And always remember

- How important it is for the person to get the job that they want, and how important it is for the client to hire the right person.

Where do you begin? Try looking at your Employer Value Proposition or your Employer Brand Pillars. (If you can't readily access them, shoot BRANDEMiX an email and we'll help you find them.) If one says you care about employees, please don't blow off the candidates.


After all, candidates are people too. In part 2, we'll talk about Vendor Care ; )

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